The trouble with transporters on Star Trek (and elsewhere)

Is the transporter on Star Trek a nifty sci-fi transportation mechanism? Or is it a sinister murder machine, killing the person who steps on the platform and spitting out a duplicate on the other end?

Start watching for the geeky fanwankery, stay for the meaty speculation about an astounding philosophical problem: The problem of consciousness. Everybody has consciousness, but nobody knows what consciousness is. You can’t prove that anybody other than you is conscious, and you can’t prove to anybody else that you’re conscious.

This is another in a series of wonderful CGP Grey video.

The story behind the story of “Babylon 5”

The Strange, Secret Evolution of Babylon 5.

We’re currently re-watching a couple of science fiction shows we used to love — Stargate SG-1 and the 21st Century Doctor Who. We tried rewatching Babylon 5, but we bounced off it after two or three episodes.

This article makes me want to give it another try, particularly to see the evolution of Londo Molari and G’kar.

J. Michael Straczynski was as far as I know the first TV show creator to actively engage fans online. Now that’s standard for producers, writers, and actors, but then it was novel.

Who owns science fiction?

Nicola Griffith ponders how her straight historical novel Hild got nominated for the science fiction and fantasy Nebula Award.

Richard Russo is one of my favorite writers. He satisfies a quality I get from science fiction and fantasy, of living in an alien world. Russo’s alien worlds are contemporary small towns in upstate New York and Maine. Likewise, the Easy Rawlins novels let me live for a time in post World War II black Los Angeles.

I’ve added Hild to my Amazon wishlist.

Who Owns SF?.