Researchers extract audio from potato chip bag and other vibrating objects in video recordings

Salt and vinegar chipsResearchers at MIT, Microsoft, and Adobe have developed an algorithm that can reconstruct an audio signal from minute vibrations of objects in a video recording, including recovering intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag photographed 15 feet away through soundproof glass.

The researchers also successfully extracted audio from video of aluminum foil, the surface of a glass of water, and the leaves of a potted plant.

I wonder whether the technique might become sensitive enough to capture sound from old silent movies, newsreels, and home movies.

Extracting audio from visual information: Algorithm recovers speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag filmed through soundproof glass

Photo: Salt-and-Vinegar, by Gerolsteiner91. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons

One of the most popular YouTube channels is an anonymous woman who unboxes Disney toys

“I call it first-person toy porn,” says David B. Williams, an Internet video executive who discovered the channel through his 3-1/2 year old twins. “I think it works because it’s Christmas morning every minute.”

YouTube’s Biggest Star Is An Unknown Toy-Reviewing Toddler Whisperer

Video habits

Do you watch movies and episodes of TV dramas all in one go? Or do you watch a few minutes at a time?

I try to watch all in one go, which has kept me away from programming like House of Cards, Her, and the True Grit remake. I’d like to see all of those, but I haven’t found big blocks of time to watch.